Globalization Delivers

Globalization has delivered, as it was intended, for the 1%. Globalization is not so much a paradigm, as some frame it, as it is a strategy of corporatist. It has preserved the gains of capitalism’s elite upper class by affording worldwide exploitation and extraction. The tactics within this strategy are many and include free trade agreements granting multinational corporations enormous access and control to exploit people and extract resources across the globe expressly for their material gain, all consistent with the requirements of the capitalist system.

 

The system of capitalism is not broken. Its adherents are enacting the beliefs and values upon which it rests, executing it precisely as designed.

 

So what needs to be abandoned is not just globalization but capitalism itself. Any system that rests upon a limited understanding (if not misunderstanding) of the very nature of humankind and its relationship to Nature can’t help but be limiting to life itself. The requirement of unlimited economic (i.e. material) growth in a finite world and objectifying people is at base an unsustainable and self-destructive (i.e. suicidal) system. Its incongruence with our humanness and with the laws of Nature can’t help but to cause destitution, destruction and death—it is polluting the world.

 

Expending effort toward curing symptoms of capitalism or of its many strategies such as globalization is a fool’s errand. Such efforts would be tantamount to seeking to rid oneself of cancer by solely attending to the pain as it emerges. Of course one might feel better in the moment but the cause continues unabated. We strive to cure diseases, not symptoms.

 

Capitalism is wrong, not because it yields booms and busts—its inevitable manifestations—but because it is foundationally incongruent with our very nature.

A materialistic mechanistic system of orientation (or paradigm) can never serve humankind. Therefore until we cease believing in and structuring life according to this system, we will never be able to envision the world differently. Until we understand ourselves as being more than independent material self-interest maximizing individuals we will be unable to create for the benefit of everyone a new system of economics in service to the development of humankind. However those most benefiting from the way things are, advance the notion that there is no alternative (a.k.a. TINA) to viewing the world and for structuring (our) life within it.

 

It is not all there is there are alternatives! We are not merely the most intelligent animals on earth who are destined to use our intelligence to maximize our very own material self-interest in the moment. The meaning of and joy in life can’t be equated to the measure of one’s material gain. What is required is a change of (not within) our system of orientation—from a materialistic mechanistic worldview to an energic living system worldview.

 

Our world is a living systems world and Nature is inextricably part of us. Though more fully argued in The Intent of Business (p 123-145) the following few paragraphs offer a summary in relation to economic endeavors, such as the conduct of business.

 

While each person is an individual—a unique whole person—each is at the same time a part of a larger whole (humankind) that is inextricably connected to Nature (the environment), to all other living systems. Contrary to how capitalism frames us, we are not a collection of independent beings bouncing off of each other in blind pursuit of our own interest but rather we are a collective, a living system deeply interdependent with each other and Nature (our environment). This interdependence rests upon the energy that flows throughout. So when life is structured incongruent with the essence of our nature the relationships that will likely ensue will adversely impact the flow of energy thus affecting our capacity for sustainability if not viability. Consequently, there are inherent ecological responsibilities necessary for our continued viability—a healthy flow of energy is essential.

 

With the flow of energy happening both within an individual and from one person to another as well as throughout Nature, this need for a healthy flow of energy is not only in regard to matter/material energy in Nature but also human energy (a.k.a. psychic energy, consciousness). Because reality is the manifestation energy flow in a living world, when we think of ecosystems we can no longer restrict our attention to the material world. So it is not just about the relationship we have with our material environment, it is also about the relationship we have with the self and each other.

 

Further, if we consider polluted energy to be energy not usable to sustain life, then it can be argued that any action that pollutes the energy of our world—such as exploitation of Nature and people— that inhibits or obstructs a healthy flow of energy would be tantamount to committing suicide. Thus it is our distinct responsibility to not act in a way that would (inevitably) pollute this energy thus adversely impacting the sustainability and viability of life.

 

Holding onto the current materialistic mechanistic system of orientation would make this energic living systems worldview quite imperceptible—the self-fulfilling prophecy of TINA. Perhaps the first step toward meaningful change could be providing people a different experience in their workplace. This different experience would come from the business organization that is organized and managed with a different intent, one other than profit maximization that serves humankind. Perhaps if a business enterprise would shift focus from material growth to human progress—this requires vision, caring and courage among those in authority—then people’s experience will be the difference that could make a difference.   Seeing what is possible can lead to believing it is possible to transcend self-interest.

4 thoughts on “Globalization Delivers

  1. As a great man once said there are three fundamental relationships that we need to be aware of 1. Our relationship with our self. 2. Our relationship with others. 3. Our relationship with our very existence. We are all interconnected, one and the same.

    I agree with you when you say that the management of organisations has to be with a different intent of looking at human progress rather than maximizing profit alone. When you manage with this intention of human progress and betterment, organisations will eventually grow on their own and sustain.

    A very nice article. Good intention. Liked it. Cheers, Ramkumar

  2. As a great man once said there are three fundamental relationships that we need to be aware of 1. Our relationship with our self. 2. Our relationship with others. 3. Our relationship with our very existence. We are all interconnected, one and the same.

    I agree with you when you say that the management of organisations has to be with a different intent of looking at human progress rather than maximizing profit alone. When you manage with this intention of human progress and betterment, organisations will eventually grow on their own and sustain.

    A very nice article. Good intention. Liked it. Cheers, Ramkumar

  3. Ramkumar, the 3 fundamental relationships you mention, as you state, require are awareness, if not our understanding.

    Gregory Gull

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s